The Advent of Dionysus

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Old 07-11-2007, 11:01 AM
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Default Eros (Cupid) and Psyche



Quote:
Eros was the god of love in Greek mythology. And with a power as potent as that of love and desire, it should come as no surprise that Eros played a significant role in myth and legend. Indeed, Eros was the darling of poets and artists over the centuries. But there is more to this god - he also inspired desire in countless Greek gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines. Read more to learn about this remarkable mythical figure.

There are two popular but very different versions of the birth of this important god. According to the Greek poet Hesiod, Eros was one of the first deities born into the world. Hesiod, in his Theogony, claims that Eros emerged from Chaos (which can be described as a sort of void) along with Gaia (the Earth) and Tartarus (the Underworld). Furthermore, the Theogony features an intriguing description of Eros:


"...and Eros, the fairest of the deathless gods;
he unstrings the limbs and subdues both mind
and sensible thought in the breasts of all gods and all men."
(Hesiod, Theogony, 120-2)


The power wielded by Eros is made clear in this passage - no one, divine or mortal, could resist his spell of enchantment. In Hesiod's version, therefore, Eros is a potent, irresistible god.

However, there is one other significant variation in myth about the birth of Eros. According to some sources, Eros was the son of the goddess Aphrodite (occasionally, it is claimed that he is the child of both Aphrodite and Ares). As Aphrodite's son, Eros loses a bit of his power and prestige and becomes more of a companion (or accomplice) to the goddess of love and desire. This could be one possible explanation for why Eros, over the centuries, is transformed in myth and art from a handsome young man to a chubby mischievous child. (For a myth about Eros, see the story of his relationship with Psyche).
http://www.loggia.com/myth/eros.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eros_%28mythology%29
http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Eros.html
http://www.theoi.com/Protogenos/Eros.html
http://homepage.mac.com/cparada/GML/Eros.html
http://www.answers.com/topic/eros-mythology


Cupid and Psyche, Bertel Thorvaldsen (1770-1844)

http://www.thorvaldsensmuseum.dk/page118.aspx
http://www.thorvaldsensmuseum.dk/page65.aspx

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupid_and_Psyche
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/cupid.html


Psyche Revived by Cupid's Kiss, Antonio Canova, Louvre

http://www.flickr.com/photos/thearchigeek/221657861/
At the Louvre

Quote:
Psyche, was a lovely princess in classical literature. Her beauty was so great that the goddess Venus (Aphrodite) became jealous of her. Venus ordered her son Cupid (Eros) to make Psyche fall in love with some ugly person.

Cupid was so startled at the loveliness of Psyche that he pricked himself with one of his own arrows. The wound made him love her, and he married her. He kept her in his palace and visited her every night. But Psyche never saw her husband. Cupid had told her that he would have to leave her if she looked at him.

One night, Psyche crept to his room with a lighted lamp. The beauty of the handsome young god surprised her, and she spilled a drop of hot oil on his shoulder. Cupid awakened, and vanished.

In her grief, Psyche went to Venus and begged to see her husband again. Venus compelled her to perform three hard tasks. The last of these caused Psyche's death. Cupid brought her back to life again. Then he begged Jupiter (Zeus) to make Venus forgive both of them. Jupiter did, and also gave immortality to Psyche.

Cupid represent the heart, and Psyche was thought to be the human soul. Her tasks and sorrows stand for the struggles of the human soul. The Greek word psyche means soul, mind, or life.
Van Johnson


Psyche, James Pradier, (1790-1852), also known as
Jean-Jacques Pradier, Swiss sculptor

http://www.univ-rouen.fr/flaubert/03...ur/psyche.html

There are more images of the sculpture at various angles at the Art Renewal website. You may need to scroll down the page to get to the images of Psyche:

http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/databa...id=1688&page=4

http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/databa...id=1688&page=5

http://www.loggia.com/myth/psyche.html
http://homepage.mac.com/cparada/GML/Psyche.html
http://www.paleothea.com/Myths/Psyche.html


Psyche Showing her Sisters her Gifts from Cupid,
Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1732-1806)

http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/htm.../01psyche.html

The original painting is at the National Gallery, London. The subject of the painting is detailed here:
Quote:
This painting illustrates an episode from the classical myth of Cupid and Psyche, which was originally told by Apuleius in his 'Golden Ass'. It is an early work by Fragonard, executed in 1753, the year after he had won the Prix de Rome and before his first Italian visit. An immediate success, it was exhibited with other paintings at Versailles in 1754, but later passed into obscurity with an attribution to Carle van Loo. At some date it was cut down along the top and left sides.

Fragonard's work is probably based on La Fontaine's version of the fable. After falling in love with Psyche, Cupid had visited her only at night, forbidding her to look upon him. In the painting, Psyche shows her two sisters the gifts she has received from her lover, and moved by jealousy - a Fury appears in the sky above the sisters - they persuade her to uncover Cupid's identity and thus wreck her happiness.

The painting shows the emergence of Fragonard's more elegant style from the manner established by Boucher, whose pupil he had been. In many details it derives from sketches made by Boucher in 1737 for a series of tapestries illustrating this story, but there is more movement in Fragonard's painting and his colours are sharper.
http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/

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Old 07-11-2007, 11:02 AM
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The Advent of Dionysus:

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St. Valentine's Day

The number 14 also corresponds to Taurus, in that there are only twelve months in the zodiac (a base twelve system), and so the fourteenth month corresponds to the second sign (Taurus). And here, some material was presented to me on the 14th day of the 14th month, in 1988—on St. Valentine's Day. I was living at my sixteenth residence at the time (hence the numbers 14 and 16 again), when some young boys came upstairs and knocked on the door. But before I got there they ran away. I knew something was up so I intended to catch them the next time. Sure enough they knocked again, and I ran quickly to the door and swung it open. But there was no one there, except a copy of a magazine—of erotic nature—resting at the doorstep. Indeed, Cupid (Eros) had played his part on this day!

It was an older issue (January 1981), somewhat tame by today's standards, which gave me the inspiration for the fourteen names: The 14 Images of Kari. They were phenomenal pictures, like nothing I'd ever seen, clearly illustrating the man/woman relationship as it unfolded. And though they were of the same woman, each was so distinct as to depict a different woman: why I gave them different names. And this was before I knew of the fourteen Gerarai! While this woman's name, Kari, is nearly a cross between Karen and Ariadne—who, was the wife and beloved of Dionysus! And indeed both Karen and Ariadne have a similar meaning: "what is holy or pure." While in the myth, Dionysus rescues Ariadne from certain obscurity on a deserted island, even as I rescued Kari after she got trashed!

Hence it should soon become clear that these things haven't happened by chance, for they appear to have been preordained. As it begins to paint a picture, that gets more clear as you continue. Thus when I developed the names, it required little effort and all fell into place: while some pictures reminded me of people I already knew, others expressed a certain quality that I ascribed a name to, and others were names that just popped up and seemed suitable when I looked them up. So it's fairly obvious I've been working with my intuition here.

The Love Connection

This was all brought home in January 1991 when I ran a personal ad in the newspaper for the first time. It was well after I developed the names, the year after I moved back from Grants Pass, Oregon to Santa Rosa, California (for the fourth time). When placing the ad, I was only half-serious when I said it would only mean something if I got a response from someone named Kari or, someone named Adrian (the closest to Ariadne), but not necessarily from both. I was thinking these of two because they signify the Gerarai as a whole, like the Queen of Athens.

I received four letters altogether (hence the number four again), and guess what? The first was from a person named Kerri, and the second was from a person named Adrienne! Which are nearly the same names! As I wasn't expecting this, least of all from both, I was perplexed, and wondered how I would decide between them. I got the opportunity to meet both women though, but nothing became of it? While another funny thing happened when I met Kerri. She decided where we would meet. Guess where? On Adrian Avenue! It was completely her idea. We met in front of the old Crown Market, which had since moved and become the 49er Pet Store (the number 49 corresponding to the name Dennis, as I relate in Karen and in chapter 8). Also, as her name was a little different, although it sounds the same, I had wondered about it. I then realized that by joining the names, you get Kerari which, if my pronunciation is correct, sounds very much like Gerarai!
http://www.dionysus.org/x0401.html#9


Cupid and Psyche Studying a Butterfly (detail), Antonio Canova

http://www.scils.rutgers.edu/~mjoseph/CP/ICP.html

Quote:
Daphne

A water nymph, and daughter of the river god Peneus, Daphne was the first love of Apollo, the god of light and reason. The counterpart of Dionysus, Apollo signified what was rational or intellectual: as corresponds to the man's intellect or his father. Thus as Daphne's element was water, she corresponds to the thought stream or, the understanding (what a river signifies in spiritual terms), an appropriate element, for she appeals directly to Apollo's understanding ...

When Daphne first appears, Apollo shows very little interest in her unkempt manner, that is until Eros (Cupid), in his sport, pierces Apollo with a golden tipped arrow, and strikes Daphne with a blunted lead tipped arrow. Apollo is then struck profoundly, as Daphne becomes a major revelation to him; while Daphne is struck with indifference. Perhaps she touches Apollo in the way water reflects the light of the sun, which produces a marvelous reflection when a gentle breeze passes over (Apollo being the god of sunlight). Perhaps this is what struck him so fervently, all these rippling facets of beauty—womanhood—embraced by the light of his golden truth: i.e., a woman's beauty being a reflection of a man's inner truth. To which Apollo makes a quick dispatch, only to have Daphne flee, and evade him by turning into a laurel tree. From where she's purportedly whisked off to Crete, and becomes Pasiphae, the mother of Ariadne (something I found out much later) ....

I once knew a young woman who was wild and free spirited, not unlike the beautiful Daphne. After moving in next door with her mother, a good friend of mine, I immediately began to have problems. In fact my whole world came crashing down! The year was 1985, with the number 85 corresponding to Daphne, as things got wild and out of hand. She had also moved back from Iowa the 29th state, while it all began on my 29th birthday, the number 29 corresponding to Daphne as well. And like Apollo, I didn't care for her unkempt manner: everything was in its place and she posed a direct threat.

Over the course of dealing with her I was at a total loss, and wholly devastated! Then one day it dawned on me who she really was, through dreams I had and things her mother had said. She was my very soul's image (anima), appearing like some big wonderful sun coming up in my mind—and she stood in its midst! It was a major revelation to me, as she became the whole embodiment of who I was. This is when Cupid struck me! While it was the beginning of the chain of events that led to the writing of this book, making it more fitting that Daphne be the first correspondent of the New Church.

I was then determined to have her, more than anything, and soon gave chase: I pursued her, I entreated her, I drew ever so close, only to have her slip through my grasp at the last moment (i.e., Apollo was found grasping the trunk of a laurel tree). It's unfortunate she misconstrued my intentions—as maligned—for it couldn't have been further from the truth. I managed to give her a good scare though, even as Apollo frightened Daphne. I mention this further in Karen (7) and Justine (8), as well as in chapter 11 (my seventh residence).

And yet another funny thing happened when we first met. We were down at the river in a forest like setting, not unlike where Apollo encountered Daphne. While at the time she conveyed a special fondness for the river, in how she delighted in being there and liked to play. Was it really Daphne, the daughter of Peneus?

"Herd the Cows"
http://www.dionysus.org/x0402.html
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Old 07-11-2007, 11:02 AM
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About the pictures ...

For the sake of authenticity, I've opted to include the fourteen nude pictures of Gerarai which I've associated with this chapter (in accord with Dionysus). Please understand it's not my intent to offend anyone but, that these pictures are of a sexual nature and, I'm not recommending their viewing by anyone under the age of 18. And yet who's to keep young boys from getting ahold of Dad's old copies of Playboy and Penthouse magazines? In fact, if it were not for such an instance, Cupid—portrayed as a small boy angel or cherub—would not have made the delivery to my doorstep on St. Valentine's Day. How strange? So I'm saying this is a must see!

If however, you are offended by such material (although somewhat tame by today's standards), I would recommend your not viewing it at this time. I would at least suggest reading the chapter though, to better understand the nature of the Gerarai and, the base fourteen numbering system developed in accord with it, both of which are integral to the book. Then, if you're intrigued by what I say, and can see that indeed sex and religion do share a common spiritual ground, you may reconsider and wish to view the pictures—but, I'll leave that up to you.

While here I should say it's been a long time in coming, having first published my webpage back in 1997, and been at a quandry over including these pictures ever since (actually since the book's inception back in 1990). My main concern being I didn't want to give people the impression it was just another cheap sexual exploitation rip-off, plus the inevitability of minors getting ahold of it. Of course I remember the first stack of old Playboy magazines a couple of friends and I discovered when I was about ten. Boy were we intrigued! There's also the fact that the material is copyrited (January 1981 issue of Penthouse). The last thing I want is to infringe upon someone's copyrite! Neither do I wish to infringe upon the privacy of a young woman (then) who may have a higher regard for her privacy nowadays. Yet the pictures are so vital!

And what of the so-called religious types: "Many will come in my name to lead many astray ..." Do I risk getting them all up in arms by such an association? And, although the book is about religion, there is an underlying association with women and sex—which, in fact is its very essence! And when the young boys delivered the magazine to my doorstep, I knew I had just found the Rosetta Stone! Replete with the blessing of Eros and Aphrodite! How is this possible you might say? It begins with the first four women's names, all of which have an affiliation with the god Apollo (unbeknownst to me at the time), starting with the story of Daphne, Apollo's first and true love who, later becomes Pasiphae, the mother of Ariadne, the wife and beloved of Dionysus. In fact this is the very story being introduced when Cupid (Eros) delivers the magazine to my doorstep. If you don't believe me then read on!
http://www.dionysus.org/x0400.html


Cupid and Psyche, Christian Gottlieb Kratzenstein-Stub (1793-1860)

http://www.scils.rutgers.edu/~mjoseph/CP/ICP.html

Quote:
Oh mighty Eros, says Apollo, what have I to do with thee? Your pangs have pierced me in such a way that I deemed not possible. Forgive my foolhardiness towards your sweet nectars of delight, for I have tasted of them and now go unfulfilled. Forgive my insolence (insulin?), lest something more tragic shall befall me, and I become a shambles of a god, not worthy of the mention of the name. Whereas I'm to understand now, that when all Chaos breaks loose (see Daphne), it's really a sign that you've arrived, and I should look at it less in terms of dis-May? and more in terms of an opportunity, for fulfillment.
http://www.dionysus.org/x0603.html


The Marriage of Cupid and Psyche, Francois Boucher (1703-1770)

http://www.rouen-musees.com/beaux_ar...planche01.html

This is only the beginning. There are other sculptures (Canova) and paintings, so I'll be working on this thread at least a year. And then there's that problem I have trying to decide between pictures and posting a multitude of links.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupid
http://www.loggia.com/myth/cupid.html
http://www.pantheon.org/articles/c/cupid.html
http://www.answers.com/topic/cupid

Psyche; or, the Legend of Love by Mary Tighe (1772-1810):

http://web.nmsu.edu/~hlinkin/
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Old 07-11-2007, 11:03 AM
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Psyche Opening the Door into Cupid's Garden, John William Waterhouse

http://www.johnwilliamwaterhouse.com...nting1400.aspx

I noticed that the models in many of John William Waterhouse's paintings seem to look alike. I read that his sister, half-sister and his wife were models in many of his paintings.

Quote:
In his early career, Waterhouse used friends and family members as subjects in his paintings, particularly his sister, half-sister, and his wife. Anyone who is familiar with Waterhouse’s body of work will easily recognize at least two women who appear numerous times in his paintings. One of the models who bears the beauty of adolesence is featured in La Belle Dame Sans Merci and A Mermaid, among many others. The other model, who appears in Lady of Shallot, possesses the mature beauty of womanhood. The faces of these models as well as others filled Waterhouse’s sketchbooks and canvasses over the years as he sought to depict the essence of womanhood.
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art33213.asp

I found another website commenting about two other paintings Hylas the the Nymphs and The Lady of Shalott by John William Waterhouse:

Quote:
Hylas and the Nymphs and The Lady of Shalott
by John William Waterhouse (1847-1917)

Hylas and the Nymphs is one of my favourite paintings, by one of the most evocative of the late pre-Raphaelite painters. Waterhouse painted quite a few classical and mythological subjects – actually, one of the best things about Waterhouse was that he just painted a lot, and if you like his work there are all sorts of his pictures available in reproduction. Many of his paintings used the same model – in this case, several times over. In this image, Hylas, the squire of Heracles, is about to be lured to his death by a number of very English water nymphs. In the original Greek myth, Hylas was sent by Heracles to search for water on the island of Cios – he's carrying a pitcher in his left hand in this picture. Waterhouse could fuse dreamlike worlds with strikingly real figures as few artists before or since.

Waterhouse was also influenced by Lawrence Alma-Tadema – as well as having himself been born in Rome – and his early works include a number of Roman landscapes and still-life paintings. What is perhaps most remarkable about Waterhouse is that while he created worlds of knights, sorceresses, devious women and mythological catastrophes on canvas, his own life was respectable and quiet. He was an associate of the Royal Academy, and lived in St. John's Wood.

The Lady of Shalott is also a personal favourite – purists will note that it's not at all indecent, and perhaps doesn't really belong here. Purists are a nuisance. The Lady of Shalott is technically an Arthurian subject, if a rather peripheral one. She was a popular subject among the pre-Raphaelite painters, however, owing perhaps more to Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem of the same name than to Malory. She's depicted by Waterhouse, William Holman Hunt, Sidney Harold Meteyard and several others. Aside from being the most attractive woman of the lot, I find Waterhouse's Lady to be the most evocative of both the poem and the myth upon which it draws. Most of the paintings of the Lady of Shalott portray her as a sorceress, rather than as a woman.

One can speculate at some length which verses of Tennyson's poem Waterhouse's painting is intended to illustrate – assuming that it's drawn from a particular passage at all. I think I favour this one:


In the stormy east-wind straining,
The pale yellow woods were waning,
The broad stream in its banks complaining,
Heavily the low sky raining
Over tower'd Camelot;

Down she came and found a boat
Beneath a willow left afloat,
And round and round the prow she wrote
The Lady of Shalott.

And down the river's dim expanse
Like some bold seer in a trance,
Seeing all his own mischance –
With a glassy countenance
Did she look to Camelot.

At the closing of the day
She loosed the chain, and down she lay;
The broad stream bore her far away,
The Lady of Shalott.

Arthurian images seem rather hackneyed at the moment – it's important to realize that we're inclined to view the myths of Camelot through entirely too many bad interpretations from Hollywood. Who among us could have sat through First Knight – or even the previews thereof – and want anything more to do with Arthur, Lancelot and the rest. Camelot has been reduced to a Monty Python production, even by film makers who might have intended otherwise. For Tennyson – and certainly for the painters who were similarly inspired a hundred years ago – Arthur was a genuine heroic figure, and the death of the Lady of Shalott a genuinely moving tale.
http://www.mindworkshop.com/alchemy/indcnt.html

Here's another painting by John William Waterhouse, My Sweet Rose (a.k.a. "The Soul of a Rose"):

My Sweet Rose
http://www.jwwaterhouse.com/view.cfm?recordid=21

More excerpts from The Advent of Dionysus:
Quote:
Conjugal Love

At this point you may be wondering why I should commit an entire chapter to sex, and its psycho-spiritual origins? For it might seem out of context with the nature of this book. And so prompts the next question. How important is eroticism for leading a fulfilled life? But, as I suggest in Diana, it portrays man's highest creative energy, and is disposed towards the procreation of young; and, that it reflects a God "who copulates," best portrayed through the activities of Zeus. Nor must we forget the erotic origin of the fourteen Gerarai (i.e., the magazine at my doorstep).

And in Swedenborg's book, Conjugal Love, he explains that conjugal or marital love, is the first and primary love that proceeds from God, from which all others proceed. While saying it's a chaste love, in and of itself (devoid of lust), that's ultimately expressed through sexual union. He also says a man's loins or "thigh" (genital region) directly corresponds. Which brings up Dionysus, the only begotten son of Zeus, born a second time from his father's thigh: signifying the "conjugal love of the Father" or, "Husband." And indeed, none of this was out of character with Dionysus' portrayal. (As it suggests something similar to my experience in chapter 5, it seems to give me specific license to discuss this.)

And in the book, Sex, Eros and Marital Love, available through the Swedenborg Foundation (by Gerhard Gollwitzer), it portrays the three levels of sexuality leading to what's truly marital: Sex, the lowest aspect, which corresponds to the "natural man," where pleasure is derived solely through the "bodily senses." Eros, the medium, where the "spiritual man" begins, as two minds are joined and begin to "coalesce." And Marital Love, the highest and only genuine aspect, involving the most "interior union" between a man and wife; and is shared more by the angels of the third or celestial heaven.

Hence we're speaking of a relationship between "Husband and Wife"—or, "God and The Church" which is suitably expressed in sexual terms. And the bottom line becomes, "eroticism is the essence of what we are," and we shouldn't be too abashed about its expression. Indeed it was very much a part of Greek culture. And, for the sake of religion, for young people especially, its flexibility needs to be stressed. But I'm not saying we should preoccupy ourselves with sex, rather, we should try and maintain a proper balance and not go to extremes, like anything else. Therefore I'm handing you a bottle of wine and asking you to drink as you like—but not to get drunk! So I won't apologize for writing this chapter.

Erotic Vision

This prompts a final experience I would like to relate before I proceed. After closing my eyes and beginning to meditate one day I had a vision: and I saw four hounds, sitting at the four corners of a square facing each other. It seemed to occur for no reason, for I wasn't thinking of anything specific; and I began to think it had something to do with the goddess Diana. And then, simultaneously, the dogs arched their backs, raised their heads, and began to howl (though I heard no sound), and turned into a man's erect penis! And when it occurred, I didn't feel anything, "emotionally," for I was looking at it objectively: it seemed matter-of-fact and nothing vulgar was implied. It was as if somebody was there pointing it out to me and saying, "Hey, look at what you've found."
http://www.dionysus.org/x0701.html#6
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Old 07-11-2007, 11:57 AM
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Psyche Abandoned by Cupid, Charles-Antoine Coypel (1694-1752)

http://www.scils.rutgers.edu/~mjoseph/CP/ICP.html

Quote:
Aphrodite

Hence the correlation to Aphrodite, who in her bewitching graciousness embodies the beautiful Ariadne, Dionysus' wife. Described as an earthly Aphrodite, Ariadne is more closely associated with Aphrodite (and Artemis), both of which emerged from the sea. While upon graduating into adulthood, Rhea initiated Dionysus into the women's secret mysteries, for which reason his worship was held in secret. There are the many phallic aspects to his worhsip as well, with Priapus, a phallic being, the offspring of his mating with Aphrodite. Hence, where Dionysus is born of Zeus' thigh, it equates with conjugal love, the first and primary love from which all others proceed—its masculine realization. While indeed, Aphrodite and Eros were two of his closest friends.
http://www.dionysus.org/x1401.html#10


Psyche, William Sergeant Kendall, (1869-1938)

http://www.unaaldia.net/?m=200601

Quote:
So I decided to introduce myself with different parts of my book. Then she could see for herself, and determine if I was real or not, while I could see if she was genuinely interested, and gauge my response accordingly. Soon afterwards, on February 13, I gave her chapter 5, The Advent of Dionysus, the first chapter I wrote (and most central), which spoke of my rebirth experience. And I said she could read my other materials if she was interested. When she read it—that day—she was clearly interested, more than anyone else had been. I found it encouraging and decided to give her chapter 4 the next day, The Gerarai (with the rest of my material), which seemed significant for it was St. Valentine's Day and, two years to the day that Cupid had called at my doorstep. (See Gerarai.)

It almost seemed critical that I give it to her at this time, and an important sign, for we're speaking of two people "meant to be joined." And what better day than Valentine's Day! But she took the day off, and I had to wait until the 15th to give it to her, which was a letdown. As significant as it seemed at the time, I've since resigned myself to what it represented: and indeed, I've gone further to explore this, with more substantial results, after placing the personal ad in the paper the next year (what I spoke of in Gerarai). And as this didn't "pan out" either, I haven't been placing so much emphasis on it. But there's still the possibility that Ariadne will show?
http://www.dionysus.org/x1202.html#48


Cupid, (three-quarter view) by Etienne Maurice-Falconet, 1716-1792


Cupid (taken inside the Louvre Museum)

http://www.scils.rutgers.edu/~mjoseph/CP/ICP.html


Cupid (front view)

http://www.scils.rutgers.edu/~mjoseph/CP/ICP.html


Cupid (side view)

http://www.scils.rutgers.edu/~mjoseph/CP/ICP.html

Cupid looks very mischievous in this sculpture. This could have been Iacchus when he was a child.
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Old 07-11-2007, 12:02 PM
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Pan Comforting Psyche, Reinhold Begas (1831-1911)

I found someone's comment about the sculpture in a literature forum:

Quote:
i also visited the Old National Gallery - a collection of German art (there is one room of French impressionists, though) and saw this sculpture - Pan Comforting Psyche:
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e3...006/statue.jpg
once again, i do not really like sculpture - it is always great sufferings and terrible emotions, but i i was stunned. the sculpture shows a moment from a myth about Psyche and Cupid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupid_and_Psyche). the moment, when Psyche tells Pan that Cupid doesn't love her anymore and Pan comforts her. something in the way Pan sits there easily and makes this gesture with his hands, as if saying: well, no use crying - made me fall in love again that day (after Nefertiti ). this simplicity of the situation and the simplicity of the solution is really touching and i am now absolutely speechless, or should we say - word-less, though emotions overwhelm me again that easy was Pan sits makes me feel as if he understands all the impermanence of the world, yet will protect and comfort Psyche and help her by all means possible.
http://www.literatureforums.net/vb3/...hp/t-4853.html

Someone's comments in a blog had a different take on the sculpture. Personally, I tend to go along with the comments of the poster in the above quote. The comments from the poster below seem to come from someone who is cynical. If Pan has a reputation with the women, I still think he's capable of expressing tenderness and genuine caring for Psyche's feelings.

Quote:
Talk about your dirty old man exploiting an emotionally vulnerable woman (Pan "Comforting" Psyche - quotation marks added - by Reinhold Begas, 1857-1858). This, evidently, is what mid-19th c. Neo-Baroque sculpture looked like.
http://kgurshtein.blogspot.com/2006_...n_archive.html

Here's a story about Eros and Psyche. I've quoted the passage about Pan:

Quote:
When Psyche awoke from her swoon, she looked around in bewilderment, for the scene which met her eyes was the same, and yet so different. The forest-trees waved their arms gently in the breeze, and whispered to each other in the glad morning light, and in the hedges the birds sang sweet songs of joy; for the skies were blue, and the grass was green, and summer was over the land. But Psyche sat up with a dull grief in her heart, feeling over her the dim shadow of a half-forgotten woe that meets those who awake from sleep. At first she wondered where she was, for her clothes were wet with dew, and looking round the still familiar scene, she saw the green glade in the forest, but no shining palace at the top. Then like a flash she remembered the night, and how by her doubt she had forfeited all her happiness, and she lay on the ground and sobbed and prayed that she might die. But soon tired out with weeping, she grew calmer, and remembered the words of her lord—how she could find him again only after long wandering and trial. Though her knees gave way beneath her, and her heart sank at the thought of setting out alone into the cruel world, she determined to begin her search forthwith. Through the dark forest she went, and the sun hid his face behind the pine-tops, and great oaks threw shadows across her path, in weird fantastic forms, like wild arms thrust out to seize her as she passed. With hurrying steps and beating heart she went on her way till she came out on the bleak mountain-side, where the stones cut her tender feet and the brambles tore her without mercy. [65] But on and on she struggled along the stony road, till the path grew soft beneath her, and sloped gently downwards to the plain. Here through green fields and smiling pastures a river wound slowly towards the sea, and beyond the further bank she saw the smoke from the homesteads rise blue against the evening sky. She quickened her steps, for already the shadows from the trees fell long across the fields, and the grass turned to gold in the light of the dying day. And still between her and shelter for the night lay many a broad meadow and silver stream to cross. As she drew nearer she looked this way and that for a ford, but seeing none, she gathered together her courage, and breathing a prayer to the gods, stepped into the water. But she was weak and faint with fasting, and at every step the water grew deeper and colder, and her strength more feeble, till at length she was borne off her feet, and swept away by the hurrying tide. In her agony she cried out,

"O god of Love, have mercy and save me ere I die, that I may come to thee!"

Just as she was about to sink, she felt a strong arm seize her and draw her up on the opposite shore. For a while she lay faint and gasping for breath; but as her strength returned, she heard close beside her soft notes of music, and she opened her eyes to see whence the sweet sounds came. She found herself lying beneath a willow-tree, against which leant a strange musician. For his head and shoulders and arms were those of a man, but his legs and feet were thin and hoofed, and he had horns and a tail like a goat. His ears were pointed, his nose was wide and flat, and his hair fell unkempt and [66] wild about his face. Round his body he wore a leopard's skin, and he made sweet music on a pipe of reeds. At first she was terrified at the sight of this strange creature, but when he saw her look up at him, he stopped playing, and smiled at her; and when he smiled he puckered his face in a thousand wrinkles, and his eyes twinkled merrily through his wild elf-locks, so that none could look on him and be sad. In spite of all her woes Psyche fairly laughed aloud as he began to caper round her on his spindle legs, playing a wild dance-tune the while. Faster and faster he went, and up and down, and round and round, till, with a last shrill note on his pipe and a mad caper in the air, he flung himself on the grass beside her.
The above is from this link. In the "Table of Contents" at the the top of the page on the left side, click on "Eros and Psyche":

http://www.mainlesson.com/display.ph...ry=_conte nts

Another story, Love and the Soul; or, The Story of Cupid and Psyche. In the "Table of Contents" at the top of the page on the left side, click on "Love and the Soul."

http://www.mainlesson.com/display.ph...ry=_con tents

Quote:
Now I've always had feelings for Julie, yet it really didn't blossom until the day someone brought a daphne plant to work. I was sitting next to Julie at the time and I said, "What is that a laurel plant?" And she said, "No, it looked like a daphne plant," for she had just been to the nursery the night before and was considering buying one. And I said, "Well, they're probably basically the same, except I believe the daphne is a type of laurel." And I asked if she was familiar with the story of Apollo and Daphne, where Apollo falls in love with Daphne, through the help of Cupid (Eros), and Apollo pursues her, only to have her flee and turn into a laurel tree. She said she was familiar with the story, but not all of the details, so I proceeded to look it up on the Internet and find a good example.
http://www.dionysus.org/x1701.html#15


Cupid and Psyche, Antonio Canova, Louvre

At the Louvre

Quote:
The feminine aspect of his nature is also revealed in his manner of loving. His whole existence is illuminated and crowned by the love of women. Anacreaon's song to him already makes it clear how close Eros and Aphrodite are to him. In it the prayer for love's fulfillment begins with the words "O Lord, whose playfellows are the mighty Eros, and the dark-eyed nymphs and violet Aphrodite!" The goddess of love is called his consort, and she supposedly became the mother of the Charites in Orchomenus by him. Thus many of the nymphs with whom he revels become his mistresses and surprise him one day with a new-born infant boy.
http://www.dionysus.org/x1704.html

I came across a picture that I really liked but I don't know the artist. It was titled "Cupid and Psyche" and I found it at the "Flickr" website.



http://www.flickr.com/photos/funny_face/102505038/

See Psyche in Darkness:

http://www.sourcetext.com/grammarian...rsv15/15.4.htm
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Old 07-11-2007, 12:02 PM
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Thomas Bulfinch

Quote:
Thomas Bulfinch (July 15, 1796 - May 27, 1867) was an American writer, born in Newton, Massachusetts to a highly-educated but not rich Bostonian merchant family. His father was Charles Bulfinch, the architect of the Massachusetts State House in Boston and parts of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C..

Thomas Bulfinch, who reorganized Psalms to illustrate the history of the Hebrews, is best known as the author of The Age of Fable, first published in 1855, and known since the 1880s as Bulfinch's Mythology.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Bulfinch

The story of Cupid and Psyche from Bulfinch's Mythology:

http://www.syc.k12.pa.us/~sms/zart/m...es/bull11.html

This is a sculpture by Gustav Vigeland, a Norwegian sculptor. It's one I hadn't seen before and I've looked at quite a few. Perhaps Human, one of the members, has heard of him. It's a rather erotic sculpture but it's a good one so I'll throw it into the mix at the risk of being suspended from the forums.


Eros and Psyche, Gustav Vigeland (1869-1943)

http://www.tu-harburg.de/rzt/rzt/it/sofie/vigeland.html
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